June 7th, 2012

Why Didn’t My Credit Score Change?

11 Comments | Twitter | |

credit score change

Credit Karma members sometimes wonder why it’s been a while since their credit score has changed. First of all, please know that it can sometimes take a significant shift in your credit profile for your score to change. While making on-time payments is a great way to build positive credit history, it can take a while before it will reflect positively on your credit score. If your on-time payment history is already pristine, continuing to make on-time payments will ensure that it stays that way, but it won’t further improve your credit health.

Even if something has changed in your credit history, another action you’ve recently taken could have counteracted the effect, causing your score to stay the same. Remember that there are various factors that influence your credit score.

When Will My Score Change?

Technically, a credit score can change at any point in time. Your credit score is calculated from dozens of different factors in your credit report. A change in your financial habits can result in a change in your credit score.

For instance, if you apply for an auto loan right now, the hard inquiry from your application will instantly show up on your credit report. Your score will reflect the subsequent change, and you should receive a credit alert email (if you’ve opted into Credit Karma’s free credit monitoring service).

Aside from instant inquiries like the above example, credit scores also change whenever a credit report is updated with new balances, loans or derogatory information from creditors. The frequency of these updates can vary by the credit bureau and the lender. In most cases, your creditor will report items like new credit line balances, payment activity, credit limit changes or late payment information every 30 days.

Bottom Line: Don’t expect your credit score to change every time you click the “Update Score Now” button. If it doesn’t change, it could be an indication of financial stability. If you’re consistent with your finances and credit, your credit score shouldn’t be constantly changing.

Find out How to Get a Better Credit Score.

Have more questions? Check out our Credit Advice Center.

11 Comments

  1. An important factor in understanding your credit score is to know “Positive credit or lack of positive credit has as much or more impact on your credit score than negative credit”. Now that point deduction technology is finally available to consumers today, it will be much easier to determine the necessary steps to increase and maintain your maximized credit score.
    Point Deduction Technology is a software program designed to analyze your credit data. Credit scores range from 350 to 850 leaving the possibility of capturing up to 500 points.

    The software recognizes many factors used in credit scoring and assigns a point deduction number per item on a credit report. The assigned numbers will range from 0 to 100+ depending on the type of accounts reported.

    The analysis separates the short term and long term point deductions, posting recommendations to recover the necessary points to increase a credit score.
    ScoreNavigator analyzes a borrower’s total credit picture based on the data reported by the bureaus. The combination of a borrower’s total credit picture as well as each individual item are factors in determining the score impact of each individual item on a report. ScoreNavigator determines with 92% accuracy the point impact of each trade line on a credit report, whether positive or negative.

    Rusty Bresse at 7:06 am on July 10, 2012
  2. My credit score went down 9 points, and nothing has changed except my trying to get my score up. It seems like I’m getting no where with trying to improve my score. Why is it going down???

    Barry Clayton at 12:37 pm on July 29, 2012
  3. I know it can be frustrating, but it all depends on where your score started and what actions you are taking with your finances. But don’t worry. Typically a 9-point fluctuation isn’t a big deal, and your score could improve again in the next billing cycle.

    bethy at 9:44 am on July 30, 2012
  4. Credit karma does not read student loans correctly that are consolidated. Thus it does not work correctly. And their tech support can’t solve their problem with software.

    To bad.

    Dan at 1:25 pm on December 13, 2012
  5. Interesting that I have all “A” in every category but a Report Card Overall grade of “C”……customer service wasn’t able to clarify…..

    David at 9:21 am on May 31, 2013
  6. Jenna

    Hi David, the overall grade isn’t an average of all of the individual grades. It’s your grade in comparison to the scores of other Credit Karma members.

    Jenna at 9:44 am on May 31, 2013
  7. My credit score is frozen and every time, I try to update my credit score, it says it’s unable to update my credit score. It’s been frozen since May 2013 and I can’t update my credit score. If I unlink my account, it says I can’t log in to creditkarma for the next two years. What Shall I do?

    Deepak at 12:00 pm on January 13, 2014
  8. Mike

    Hi Deepak – Thanks for the question. Please email Member Support directly at support@creditkarma.com and we’ll be happy to help you out with your problem. Thanks!

    Mike at 9:56 am on January 14, 2014
  9. Thanks for the prompt response Mike. I’ve sent an email to the support team. Hope you guys fix it soon

    Deepak at 4:21 pm on January 15, 2014

Enter your comment